7. St Heliers Reserve/Vellenoweth Green

The original Recreation reserve was formed in the early 1880swhen the St Heliers Land Company subdivided St Heliers Estate and was required to set aside land for public use. It was a rough, swampy piece of land which extended to the foreshore. In 1894 with growing 5 6 7 a major part in securing this area as a public reserve in the 1890’s. The two large Moreton Bay Fig Trees were planted at the time of the beach carnival held in January 1923 to raise money for tree planting, public conveniences and for the fire brigade. These trees are native to Australia and found in east coast rainforests. The marble and stone Drinking Fountain in Georgian style marks the inauguration by the Tamaki West Road Board of a piped water supply to St Heliers in March 1914. This fountain was restored in 2003. demand for beach-front lots the then River Plate Co. offered the people of St Heliers 2.25 acres at the southern end of the reserve in exchange for the reserve beach frontage to a depth of 150feet. There followed a ten-year legal battle between the company and a group of local residents. Eventually the Supreme Court found in favour of the residents and created a public reserve of 8.5 acres in perpetuity. The Reserve is the subject of its own act of Parliament enacted in 1995. In 1977 the Council agreed with a residents’ petition to name the passive part of the reserve Vellenoweth Green. Many events such as “Round the Bays” and “Weetbix Tryathlon” finish at the Green. The “two-way” Stoned Back Seat constructed in the early 1960s by the St Heliers Beautifying Society commemorates the efforts of Edward and Anna Vellenoweth, two St Heliers settlers, who played a major part in securing this area as a public reserve in the 1890’s. 

Photo: Sir George Grey Special Collection

The two large Moreton Bay Fig Trees were planted at the time of the beach carnival held in January 1923 to raise money for tree planting, public conveniences and for the fire brigade. These trees are native to Australia and found in east coast rainforests. The marble and stone Drinking Fountain in Georgian style marks the inauguration by the Tamaki West Road Board of a piped water supply to St Heliers in March 1914. This fountain was restored in 2003.

Photo: Sir George Grey Special Collection


          
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